Five things your office should have (but probably hasn't)

We have been posting some articles about wonderful offices of companies such as Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Adobe, which probably all don’t have this issue.

If you read the Leesman review you have come across the section that shows how well employees believe certain workspace functions are supported within their workplace.

Here are 5 that seem to always be the least supported by respondents – and some thoughts on why they should be:

READING
READING

Allowing employees space to read quietly seems like it might be a waste of space, but is important. Reading (in a book or on a computer) is absolutely essential to completing many tasks like researching or proofreading. By not allowing for this essential task to be done without interruption, you are asking for less-than-full focus to be given to that task.

QUIET ROOMS FOR CONCENTRATED WORKING ALONE OR IN PAIRS
QUIET ROOMS FOR CONCENTRATED WORKING ALONE OR IN PAIRS

This is very similar to the point above, but important to reiterate. Normal workplace tasks do not always need to be done out in the open where you’re more likely to be on guard and unfocused. For small teams of two, working in private can be helpful to eliminate the possibility of others joining what seems like an open collaborative effort.

CREATIVE THINKING
CREATIVE THINKING

Who would have thought that workplaces wouldn’t provide adequate space and resources to thinking. While there is no exact definition to what workplace environment best assists ‘thinking’, companies might work to see how their employees best come up with great thoughts and ideas – and then try to establish those office design features or office policies as a way to nurture creative thought.

RELAXING | TAKING A BREAK
RELAXING | TAKING A BREAK

If you work in an office, chances are that you leave the premises for a chance to take a break because sitting in the lunchroom just doesn’t cut it. Some companies have added meditation rooms, places to get a massage, and nap rooms – you might consider just giving employees comfortable places to sit away from the hustle and bustle of the general workspaces.

VIDEO CONFERENCING FACILITIES
VIDEO CONFERENCING FACILITIES

Though it does get a lot of negative feedback, it seems to make the list every quarter. This is most probably because most companies simply use the cameras on a computer, which aren’t the most conducive for group video conversations.

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